Leveraging Amazon EC2 F1 Instances for Development and Red Teaming in DARPA’s First-Ever Bug Bounty Program

Leveraging Amazon EC2 F1 Instances for Development and Red Teaming in DARPA’s First-Ever Bug Bounty Program

This past year, Effectual’s Modernization Engineers partnered with specialized R&D firm Galois to support the launch of DARPA’s first public bug bounty program – Finding Exploits to Thwart Tampering (FETT). The project represents a highly unique use case showcasing Effectual’s application expertise, and was approved this week to be featured on the AWS Partner Network (APN) Blog.

Authored by Effectual Cloud Architect Kurt Hopfer, the blog will reach both AWS customers and technologists interested in learning how to solve complex technical challenges and accelerate innovation using AWS services.

Read the full post on the AWS APN Blog

In 2017, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) engaged research and development firm Galois Galois to lead the BESSPIN project (Balancing Evaluation of System Security Properties with Industrial Needs) as part of its System Security Integrated through Hardware and Firmware (SSITH) program.

The objective was to develop tools and techniques to measure the effectiveness of SSITH hardware security architectures, as well as to establish a set of “baseline” Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) systems-on-chip (SoCs) without hardware security enhancements.

While Galois’s initial work on BESSPIN was carried out entirely using on-premises FPGA resources, the pain points of scaling out to a secure, widely-available bug bounty program soon emerged.

It was clear that researchers needed to be able to stress test SSITH hardware platforms without having to acquire their own dedicated hardware and infrastructure. Galois leveraged Amazon EC2 F1 instances to scale infrastructure, increase efficiencies, and accelerate FPGA development.

Learn more –>