How Private NAT Gateways Make for Easier Designs and Faster Deployments

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How Private NAT Gateways Make for Easier Designs and Faster Deployments

NAT Gateways have historically been used to protect resources deployed into private subnets in virtual private clouds (VPCs). If you have data that resides in resources deployed on a private subnet in a VPC that needed to access information outside the VPC (on the internet or on premise) and you wanted to exclude incoming connections to those resources, you’d use a NAT Gateway. The NAT Gateway would provide access to get what you needed and allow that traffic to return, but still wouldn’t allow something that originated from the outside get in. 

The core functionality of a NAT Gateway is allowing that one-way request origination flow.

Earlier this month, AWS announced that you can now launch NAT Gateways in your Amazon VPC without associating an internet Gateway to your VPC. The private NAT Gateway allows you to route directly to Virtual Private Gateways or Transit Gateways without an Internet Gateway in the path for resources that need to reach out to internal tools, like a data center, VPC, or something else on-prem.

This might seem like a modest bit of news, but it will lead to improved performance on both the business and engineering levels and demonstrates the constant innovation AWS provides its customers. 

Innovation continues at the fundamental level 

Continuous innovation has always been at the core of how AWS approaches problem solving. This is true for the bleeding edge of technology and for the fundamental building blocks of well-established disciplines, such as networking. The idea of Network Address Translation (NAT) isn’t anything new; it’s been a core building block for years. 

In the past, though, you would have done it on your own server, deploying, configuring, and maintaining a NAT instance. AWS brought the NAT Gateway into the fold; the differentiator being that this was a managed service offering that lets you use infrastructure as code or simply make a few clicks in your console to attach a NAT Gateway to a private subnet in a VPC, so you don’t have to worry about the underlying infrastructure. There are no third-party tools or complex configuration to worry about. 

With the private NAT Gateway, AWS is instilling a new feature into something that’s fundamental, making it easier for companies and individuals to be more efficient and productive. 

We see the same type of excitement and attention to detail both with major launches and when introducing new ways to use a product or service that already exists. It’s that combination of innovation for fundamental core offerings to make them easier to use plus bleeding edge innovation that really highlights the depth of expertise across AWS and its partners. 

With the private NAT Gateway, AWS is instilling a new feature into something that’s fundamental, making it easier for companies and individuals to be more efficient and productive. 

Learn more about AWS Private NAT Gateways here

A boost in efficiency

Before the private NAT Gateway, every NAT Gateway had a hard dependency on an Internet Gateway being attached to the VPC for egress. Communication to on premise resources via NAT Gateway required routing through an Internet Gateway or some other networking construct that added a layer of complexity to protecting those private resources in a private VPC. The real benefit of this feature add is the ease of protecting those resources that need to reach out. 

At its core, the private NAT Gateway is simplifying that outgoing request pattern — and it leads to a boost in efficiency. 

For businesses, the NAT Gateway allows a consistent managed service offering from AWS to protect those private resources that need outbound connectivity from a private subnet in a VPC. Prior to the private NAT Gateway, you would have needed to solve for that idea using a third-party tool or a more complex networking architecture. 

Security departments now have a more secure pattern that is less prone to misconfiguration since an Internet Gateway is no longer a dependency. This makes understanding how the organization is applying NAT Gateways and how operations teams are managing them easier. They are able to standardize on a private NAT Gateway approach, reproducing the pattern for the networking path for these outgoing requests consistently.

For individual engineers, a private NAT Gateway simplifies design and deployment because of its inherent ease — a few clicks in your console or lines in infrastructure as code, rather than relying on a more cumbersome third-party tool or a more complex configuration. AWS is extending the functionality of the managed service part of a NAT Gateway to the specific use case of handling private subnet outgoing traffic. This addition makes design easier, it makes deployment faster, and it makes the entire subject more repeatable, because you’re just consuming that managed NAT Gateway service from AWS.

Why this is worth a look

As an engineer, I certainly understand the mindset of wanting to minimize complexity. Enterprise users have NAT Gateways deployed with a dependency on an Internet Gateway and likely have more complex routing solutions in place to protect against unintended incoming requests via that Internet Gateway. Those solutions might be working just fine, and that’s great.  

But from my vantage point, I strongly encourage you to take another look at your egress-only internet and NAT Gateways architecture for private subnets. You could be missing an opportunity to greatly streamline how you work.

At worst, you can simplify how you use your “egress-only” communications. At best, you’ll eliminate a third-party tool and save money while freeing up more of your individual time.

That’s worth taking a second look at the way you’re operating. We should be regularly evaluating our deployments anyway, but it especially applies in networking complexity and simplification. 

I look forward to the improved ease of use for my clients with private NAT Gateways, and am confident you’ll find a similar model of success with your deployments.